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Shifting Recoil Lathe to Pocket Further than Material Center

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  • Shifting Recoil Lathe to Pocket Further than Material Center


    Hi All,

    I have spent the past few days reading through every single thread on this topic from pages 1 - 5 of 8. Excellent work, comments, and suggestions that y'all have given!

    After a year with my Stinger 2 I am finally going to make use of the indexing lathe. I noticed that moving my spindle to the index lathe in the max x direction puts the bit a little over the center line. My part requires to machine more in the x direction of the material.

    My solution is to drill and tap the recoil frame so I can move the recoil bars closer to the CNC work bed. I was thinking of moving it closer around an inch or maybe even have two options. The first 1 inch closer and the other say 1.75 inches closer to give me more room to machine in the x direction relative to the center of the material. I understand and am ok that this will reduce my maximum material diameter I can use.

    Any reasons why I shouldn't drill,tap, and move the recoil lathe closer as mentioned above? Have any of y'all done this before? Any other recommendations or advice would be greatly appreciated!
  • #2

    I cannot speak with experience, but as long as there's no issue with clearance, I don't visualize and physical issues. You will, of course, need to change settings in WinCNC so it knows where that recoil moved to, however... ;)
    ---
    Jim Becker

    SR-44 (2018), 1.7kw spindle, Performance Premium, USB, Keypad, T-Slot table (y-axis configuration), WinCNC, VCarve Pro upgraded to Aspire

    Non CNC stuff...

    SCM/Minimax
    Festool "a good collection"
    Stubby - lathe
    Oneida Cyclone
    more...

    Retired from full time work in the telecom industry 9/2017
    Occasional commission work for others, but mostly for me...furniture/tack trunks/signage/guitars
    Located Bucks County PA

    Comment

    • #3

      I wonder if you could drill in for dowel pins in the steel so you could always get it to the same locations?
      Charlie L
      Stinger II, 48 by 48, 1.7 kW Spindle, FTC + Laser + Recoil + Vacuum, July 2012
      WinCNC 2.5.03, Aspire, PhotoVCarve, Windows 7 Pro SP1

      Comment

      • #4

        The only thing I’d be cautious about is that the lathe stepper motor can’t take too much force. If I have a 3” square piece of stock on it, I can rotate it (skip steps) with my hands with a bit of pressure.

        That being said, I did quite a bit of flat machining on some spindles a few months ago. The flat/carved parts are 2” square and have mortises all done as 2D, using A commands to get 0/90/180/270 degrees. I created hand gcode files that called Vectric gcode files after rotating to correct positions. I started with those 3” blanks.

        Attached Files
        Gary
        2018 Stinger II SR-44, 1.7kW Spindle, Performance Premium, Recoil, Gantry Lift, Cyclone
        Fusion 360
        Aspire

        Comment

        • #5

          Nice work!

          Comment

          • #6

            Thanks! Still building with them. Taking forever.
            Gary
            2018 Stinger II SR-44, 1.7kW Spindle, Performance Premium, Recoil, Gantry Lift, Cyclone
            Fusion 360
            Aspire

            Comment

            • #7

              Gary,

              I am looking to add chuck to my Stinger III recoil. Want to make some table legs. Was looking for a while for examples of flat machining on the indexing lathe. Found your post with photos and this is exactly what I am looking to do on a bit a large scale. My table designs call for 4"x4" and 6"x6" legs. I use mortise and tenon construction exclusive. What make and model chuck are you using on your Stinger II? My goal is to limit to a single chuck with jaws that can handle materials from 2"+ to 6-8". Is this even possible or I have to go with two: small and medium size chucks? My Stinger III, head stock comes with a 1” x 8 TPI threaded shaft.
              Viktor
              Stinger III (SR-48) with Indexing Lathe
              Last edited by 4Rider; 12-26-2021, 09:31 AM.

              Comment

              • #8

                You change out the jaws on the chuck. I have a Oneway Talon Chuck, which comes with #2 jaws. I also have the small jaws (part number 2156) and the #3 jaws (2158) for bigger diameters like 3” blanks. There are even bigger jaws you can buy. #3 let’s you get up to 4 3/4” external and 5 3/8 internal. Just make sure to get a copper screw to lock the chuck properly to the shaft. Someone suggested putting in a piece of solid copper wire in front of a regular screw. That should work too.

                You want 6x6, but I’m pretty sure the x axis won’t travel out that far to the right. I could be wrong, but I don’t think so.
                Gary
                2018 Stinger II SR-44, 1.7kW Spindle, Performance Premium, Recoil, Gantry Lift, Cyclone
                Fusion 360
                Aspire

                Comment

                • #9

                  Gary,

                  Thank you. I was looking at nova and oneway (Talon and Stronghold) chucks. Nova has small capacity jaws, so it won't do it for me. As you mentioned Talon has multiple options and Stronghold has even more choices for jaws in the dimensions I work with. I know Stronghold is pricier and heavier (at ~8lbs) than Talon, but I am looking at it as possible option. Looks like the base chuck and #3 jaws run at around $250 without shipping. There is also Australian made vicmark chucks capable of handling larger stock, but heavier and pricier (+$100). I made a note to myself to use copper screw to lock the chuck on the shaft. I am interested in how you did the flat machining on the legs? Have you done it in 2 parts, one for the round profile and then came back with separate file for the flat? I use Aspire 10.5 with my Stinger III SR-48.
                  Viktor

                  Comment

                  • #10

                    I don't think you will find a "one size fits all" chuck that is heavy duty enough for large projects and intricate enough for small projects. I have a SuperNova2 that I use on my lathe and a Nova G3 that I use on the Camaster. The SuperNova2 is a mid range chuck and the G3 is their smaller range. If I needed a chuck for very large projects I would buy a Nova Titan III. Nova chucks are well built and have the best range of accessories and jaws on the market.
                    Steve
                    __________________
                    Camaster Stinger 1 with Recoil (2019)
                    FTC
                    1hp Spindle
                    Laser crosshair
                    Wireless Pendant
                    Aspire 11

                    Comment

                    • #11

                      I don't understand why you would want to move the recoil for more x movement? The purpose of the indexer is to turn the piece such that the spindle can cut it so it will be under the spindle. The more you move it in towards your machine bed the less diameter piece you can cut. If I am missing something please enlighten me. ????
                      Keith Hyde, Winchester, VA
                      2016 Stinger 1, 1.7KW HF Spindle HSD
                      Performance Package Pro, Vac, lathe, Aspire 10
                      Former Marine and retired Seabee Master Chief.
                      Furniture is my hobby not my vocation.
                      hyde.consulting@comcast.net

                      Comment

                      • #12

                        The dirty little secret of the Vectric rotary options are that the formulae to “unwrap” a cylinder are not trivial. The circles I created that are similar to the standard clipart did not come out round on a test piece. They were oval. And I realized that the simulation showed this as well! The solution was simple for the flat pieces. I just created a regular flat job with the 3D artwork. I also had vectors to create a long mortise toolpath. I also had a flattening toolpath. I would put a 3x3 blank on the lathe and put a square on the rotary rails and rotate until there wasn’t any gap between the square and the blank. Then I’d zero A. After that, I ran a custom g-code file that would do things like g0a0 and run the 3D carving path. Then it would do g0a90 and run the same 3D carving path again. Then it would do g0A180 and run the flattening toolpath and then the mortise toolpath. Then do g0a270 and run the flattening toolpath again. And maybe the mortise if the leg was for the back of the cabinet.

                        I also ran a custom g-code file to do the rounding for the bottom portion of the leg. I did use the rotary option in aspire to create the spirals, and they were simply done with a round over bit. Still had a crapload of sanding to do for them! The base of the leg was from a molding toolpath, but I did a lot of hand editing to the produced g-code file to save time.

                        There were also other cleaning toolpaths that I didn’t mention in the previous two paragraphs. And toolpaths to create the top tenon. But that’s easy if you’re machining it as a flat piece. The only trick is to remember that you use half the height you actually want. So a rectangle with a pocketing toolpath leaving a half inch of material will actually have 1’ of material when opposite sides are carved. Hope this helps.
                        Gary
                        2018 Stinger II SR-44, 1.7kW Spindle, Performance Premium, Recoil, Gantry Lift, Cyclone
                        Fusion 360
                        Aspire

                        Comment

                        • #13

                          Well this is interesting. This is what I've been thinking of doing on the lathe, a flat tenon the end of the leg.

                          I don't even have my machine yet.

                          Thanks, Gary

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