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Maloof style rocking chair

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  • #31

    Russell,

    I don't think I will ever try to make anything like this (and it definitely will not be that nice!!!) but I sure do enjoy seeing your posts and learning how you go about the process! Thanks for sharing!

    Mike
    Mike Schnorr
    Stinger 1 with Spindle and Recoil
    Win CNC - Aspire 10.0
    Sidewinder Back Knife Rotary
    www.artcentergraphics.com
    www.baconwood.com

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    • #32

      Just amazing !
      Herb Holmes

      Stinger I
      Performance Pkg
      Slotted table
      WINCNC
      Aspire 8.505
      Porter Cable 2.25
      CAMaster Stand
      KRS USB Keypad


      I've got to many clamps , and sometimes they are not enough

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      • #33

        Beautiful stuff! Bravo! Thanks for posting.

        I like both finishes - natural & stained.

        -B
        IBILD Solutions - High Definition 3D Laser Scanning Services - Advanced CNC Training and Consultation - Vectric Custom Video Training IBILD.com

        Comment

        • #34

          Thanks guys!

          Brady, no stain on any of my work, just different woods used. I'm playing around with new finishes, and really liking a new hardwax oil finish from Scotland. I'm going to start mixing my own hardwax oil finishes, using tung oil, double boiled linseed oil, beeswax and maybe some polyurethane to build the base up faster. I've tried conversion finishes, and post catalyzed, but they don't give the look and feel I'm looking for. I keep going back to tung oil based finishes.

          I like soaking in a couple coats of thinned tung oil first, because that is about the best water resistant finish out there and is flexible when cured so that movements in the wood do not destroy the water resistance.

          Since my chairs are shipped all over north america, and humidity is so vastly different in different climates, its really important to have a good seal on the wood so that the moisture content in the finished wood will change VERY slowly.
          Russell Crawford
          Cobra 408 ATC with recoil
          Alberta, Canada
          www.cherryleaf-rustle.com

          Comment

          • #35

            Originally posted by rcrawford View Post
            Brady, no stain on any of my work, just different woods used.
            That's even more impressive. I would have a hard time deciding between the blonde & dark variants. They are quite lovely - as if they are saying, "Come hither & rest your bones, my friend."

            It's refreshing to see someone on top of their game & a master of their craft. Many have no idea how many countless hours you have poured into just ONE component in your overall design. I totally get that it takes so much more than 'just pushing a button' with what you are doing.

            Some still believe that using CNC technology is somehow disingenuous - without realizing that it is just a tool - it can just as easily cut out parts of proper or horrendous aesthetic! It always takes an artist on the front end to create the good stuff...and it is NEVER a mistake when a beautiful part or complete vision is the result.

            So...a big tip of the hat to you Russell!

            -B
            IBILD Solutions - High Definition 3D Laser Scanning Services - Advanced CNC Training and Consultation - Vectric Custom Video Training IBILD.com

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            • #36

              Thanks Brady. You would know how much work goes into modelling things like this!!

              The armrests are very complex, and took me about 40 hours of modelling, cutting prototypes, revamping the model, cutting another prototype, etc. Aspire was actually better than Rhino for this type of shape, which meant I could only design one side at a time (Aspire isn't true 3D, so can't design the top and bottom cuts at the same time!), and hope when they were cut I had the thicknesses correct so the armrest would fit into place with the legs!

              The back legs look simple, but the joint area for the seat and headrest was very complex since it sits at an angle compared to the long axis of the leg (the head rest is wider than the seat by about 3.5").

              In retrospect, I would simply take one of my handcarved armrests and have someone like you scan it and make the model for me!!!
              Russell Crawford
              Cobra 408 ATC with recoil
              Alberta, Canada
              www.cherryleaf-rustle.com

              Comment

              • #37

                Originally posted by rcrawford View Post
                ...and hope when they were cut I had the thicknesses correct so the armrest would fit into place with the legs!
                Roger that!

                I've gotten pretty good at this for customers with Aspire who have gun stocks, furniture legs, guitar necks etc. (ArtCAM guys too...) Few understand or realize that you can do 4 and 5 axis machining on a 3 axis machine if you are determined, smart and genetically stubborn enough to not give up!

                -B
                IBILD Solutions - High Definition 3D Laser Scanning Services - Advanced CNC Training and Consultation - Vectric Custom Video Training IBILD.com

                Comment

                • #38

                  Russell:
                  I was exploring the forum and came across this thread where you talk about Sam Maloof. I have to send you a photo (Sam and my friend's wife)taken at his Alta Loma workshop and house property just 6 months before he passed in May of 2009. A dear friend of ours used to be a dosin <sic> at this property and he invited me, my wife and another couple to go there for a tour. At that time most visitors were not allowed in the actual workshop, but Sam came along, chatted with all of us and personally took us into the workshop as well to see his unbelievable exotic wood storage room. Some of these woods were actually extinct at that time. It was quite the experience and to see his work (mostly managed then by his son) was something that I will never forget. I wish that I took some photos of the workshop but I think that I was politely told that was a no no. You surely are following a true artist!
                  Attached Files
                  CNC newbie and US Army Vietnam vet
                  Stinger 1 SR-23, 1.7 KW HSD Spindle, Performance Package Pro, USB, T-Slot table, (Y-axis configuration), WinCNC, VCarvePro, Aspire 11, 7W Laser Engraver, Kent dust hood

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                  • #39

                    Russell, great work. I love seeing you use the CNC for furniture. As a newbie I'm still focused on sheet goods but look to doing more two sided cutting and shaping. I really appreciate the pictures of fixtures, parts in progress, and your process.

                    Way back when, my original education was in custom furniture and, from that perspective, I'd respectfully disagree about a kit being disrespectful or taking-away from other furniture makers. For a kit, your market will be hobbyist woodworkers who have the skills and tools to assemble and finish a piece like. It'll be a niche market. In most cases, I'd guess they don't have the skills to do it from scratch but do have the desire to up level their work and produce something outside of their comfort zone. I'd also guess that most of your market may not have the financial where-withal to buy a custom made, Sam Maloof inspiration. Put another way, I can't think of a single client we had who also did wood working.

                    I think one of the biggest challenges you'd have though is with wood movement. The joints you've developed (love them by the way) require precision and tight tolerances. Once you ship them out and the humidity changes... I'm not sure how you'd compensate for that and maintain the design integrity.

                    - William
                    Cobra Elite 408, ATC, 5 hp spindle, vacuum table, 4th axis, Fusion 360

                    Comment

                    • #40

                      Originally posted by LewisShanks View Post
                      Russell:
                      I was exploring the forum and came across this thread where you talk about Sam Maloof. I have to send you a photo (Sam and my friend's wife)taken at his Alta Loma workshop and house property just 6 months before he passed in May of 2009. A dear friend of ours used to be a dosin <sic> at this property and he invited me, my wife and another couple to go there for a tour. At that time most visitors were not allowed in the actual workshop, but Sam came along, chatted with all of us and personally took us into the workshop as well to see his unbelievable exotic wood storage room. Some of these woods were actually extinct at that time. It was quite the experience and to see his work (mostly managed then by his son) was something that I will never forget. I wish that I took some photos of the workshop but I think that I was politely told that was a no no. You surely are following a true artist!
                      That is awesome! I wish I could have met Sam and get a tour of his shop. I just got to know of him from books, and still haven't seen one of his original designs in person (not many of his works in Canada). His work was truly inspirational, mostly because he came up with his designs on his own, without and formal education on design or construction in his early years.
                      Russell Crawford
                      Cobra 408 ATC with recoil
                      Alberta, Canada
                      www.cherryleaf-rustle.com

                      Comment

                      • #41

                        Originally posted by William View Post
                        Russell, great work. I love seeing you use the CNC for furniture. As a newbie I'm still focused on sheet goods but look to doing more two sided cutting and shaping. I really appreciate the pictures of fixtures, parts in progress, and your process.

                        Way back when, my original education was in custom furniture and, from that perspective, I'd respectfully disagree about a kit being disrespectful or taking-away from other furniture makers. For a kit, your market will be hobbyist woodworkers who have the skills and tools to assemble and finish a piece like. It'll be a niche market. In most cases, I'd guess they don't have the skills to do it from scratch but do have the desire to up level their work and produce something outside of their comfort zone. I'd also guess that most of your market may not have the financial where-withal to buy a custom made, Sam Maloof inspiration. Put another way, I can't think of a single client we had who also did wood working.

                        I think one of the biggest challenges you'd have though is with wood movement. The joints you've developed (love them by the way) require precision and tight tolerances. Once you ship them out and the humidity changes... I'm not sure how you'd compensate for that and maintain the design integrity.

                        - William
                        I've thought again about selling kits. I've completely stopped shipping rockers outside of Canada (particularly not to the US). My last rocker, which I ship in custom wood crates, was opened by US border officials and then the rocker was stuck in a cardboard box with the rockers sticking out. Arrived in Brooklyn all scratched up and dented. Customer couldn't ship back because the cardboard box they put it in was destroyed during shipping, so I had to find a shop in Brooklyn to refinish the rocker, at a cost of $1500. Haven't shipped a rocker to the US since. The shipping company took no responsibility, because it was the border agents who switched the packaging. And the border agents just laughed at me when I asked them about compensation.

                        Wood movement would definitely be a problem with tight fitting joints. I am always concerned about shipping completed furniture to different climates, as humidity changes can wreak havoc on even finished pieces.
                        Russell Crawford
                        Cobra 408 ATC with recoil
                        Alberta, Canada
                        www.cherryleaf-rustle.com

                        Comment

                        • #42

                          Originally posted by rcrawford View Post

                          ... My last rocker, which I ship in custom wood crates, was opened by US border officials and then the rocker was stuck in a cardboard box with the rockers sticking out. Arrived in Brooklyn all scratched up and dented. ...
                          That's a nightmare. Definitely make anyone think twice about shipping cross boarder.
                          Cobra Elite 408, ATC, 5 hp spindle, vacuum table, 4th axis, Fusion 360

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