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  #1  
Old 04-07-2021, 02:54 PM
Racegrafix Racegrafix is offline
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Default Wiring new machine

I have a stinger 3, just got it in shop, but no clue on wiring, where the wires even go, I did see something about 4 wire 30a(guess) 220v (it was vague, but math tells me it should be around that). I have an electrician on standby, but no idea where we are even wiring. Someone else has to have been through this, since these machines have less documentation than a chinese one. Just trying to get this thing going.

UPDATE
For anyone getting new machine, the box you need to connect to is under table, on back side of the main box with stinger logo.

Some instructions would be awesome help and time saver, but maybe everyone else already knows everything ahead of time. i will try to post any info to help the people getting new machines, because there is zero documentation that comes with a new machine. So I will try to do my part and help since I have to claw through it step by step.

Last edited by Racegrafix; 04-07-2021 at 04:05 PM.
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Old 04-07-2021, 08:08 PM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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You need to refer to the prep guide for your machine for the circuit requirements. Steppers are definitely 4 wire (dual voltage), but folks with servos have been indicating 3 wire. The actual circuit size is dependent on the size of your spindle in kw. The 1.7kw requires 30 amps and the 3.0kw requires 40 amps.

The connections for the power are under the table, just behind the control box...a grey box...and everything is color coded. (black, red, white, green)

Here's the Stinger III prep guide but this one is definitely for steppers. Be sure you check with Camaster if you got servos...there may be an alternative document.

https://www.camaster.com/wp-content/...ep%20Guide.pdf
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Old 04-07-2021, 08:33 PM
Racegrafix Racegrafix is offline
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Thank you for the better explanation. Im guessing its stepper, I dont think they put servo on the stinger 3.
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Old 04-07-2021, 08:38 PM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Some folks have been able to order the Stinger II and Stinger III with servos but if you didn't ask for that, then the document I pointed you to is the one you need. Don't forget you must have a disconnect at the wall for the machine. That can either be a physical four wire plug or a lockable disconnect switch. My setup is 1.7kw with a 30 amp four wire circuit...I use an L14 twist lock plug and receptacle at the wall for my disconnect. (I actually do unplug the machine when it's not in use to positively have it not connected to avoid surge from storms, etc.
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  #5  
Old 04-07-2021, 08:50 PM
Racegrafix Racegrafix is offline
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Yep, was planning on doing plug like I use for welder, which is 50a. And good point on keeping unplugged, I do the same on my mill as well.
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Old 04-08-2021, 08:18 AM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Racegrafix View Post
Yep, was planning on doing plug like I use for welder, which is 50a. And good point on keeping unplugged, I do the same on my mill as well.
Don't put a 50a connector on a 30 amp circuit! The other way around is fine, but you don't want a receptacle that is intended for higher amperage on a lower amperage circuit. Now if you're going to run the machine on the same 50 amp circuit that you use with your welder...no problem putting on a 50 amp plug on the CNC...but it needs to be a four wire setup. Many 50 amp arrangements are only three wire.

The correct termination for a four wire 30 amp circuit is an L14. There is an equivalent for a 40 amp circuit.
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Old 04-08-2021, 05:06 PM
Logan Y Logan Y is offline
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You can use a 50 amp receptacle on a 30 amp circuit depending on the wiring configuration but you should never use a 30 amp receptacle on a 50 amp circuit. The receptacle won't handle the load and could cause a fire.

If you want a true plug in type option something like this would be fine since it is rated for more than the 40 amps of the circuit and is a true 4 wire option. Most 50 amp RV plugs and receptacles are 4 wire that I know of so those could be an option as well.

https://www.grainger.com/product/49Y...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
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  #8  
Old 04-08-2021, 05:37 PM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Logan, I’m sorry but that is backwards. Never put a 50 amp receptacle on a 30 amp circuit. That would allow you to plug in a device that greatly exceeds the circuit’s capabilities. You can, however, use a 30 amp receptacle on a 50 amp circuit...for a 30 amp (or less) rated device.
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  #9  
Old 04-08-2021, 06:54 PM
Logan Y Logan Y is offline
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I should have been more clear. What you are saying is both correct and incorrect. It isn't good practice to do either option in most circumstances. It is also good to remember that you shouldn't ever exceed more than 80% of the rated load for an outlet or breaker service.

The issue with having a larger rated outlet on a smaller rated service is having a 50amp outlet may give the impression that you can pull more than 30 amps or whatever the breaker is rated for from that service. The breaker should trip though if you plugged in a larger machine requesting more draw.

Conversely the issue with having a smaller rated outlet on a larger rated service is that the outlet itself is not constructed for the increased amperage load. While the load shouldn't exceed whatever machine plugged in is rated for it can (typically at start up). The problem you will have now is that the service from the breaker allows a larger amount of amperage through the outlet than it is rated for and since the breaker doesn't know any better the fault will occur at the outlet and not at the breaker.

So in short both options are not a great idea and can lead to problems. I prefer my fail to occur at the breaker and not the outlet, but I see the issue with both. Maybe that's why the NEC leads inspectors to match outlets to the size of the service that way there aren't any potential issues.
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  #10  
Old 04-08-2021, 07:11 PM
Jim Becker Jim Becker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan Y View Post
The issue with having a larger rated outlet on a smaller rated service is having a 50amp outlet may give the impression that you can pull more than 30 amps or whatever the breaker is rated for from that service. The breaker should trip though if you plugged in a larger machine requesting more draw.
This was the point I was making. The breaker "should" trip if the current draw of the device exceeds the rating, but given breakers are never perfect, using a higher rated termination on a lower rated circuit "could" cause a dangerous situation, but mostly gives the visual impression that there's a higher rated circuit than there is and someone could easily plug in a device that requires, say 50 amps, but can't get it from that circuit. Code isn't going to be copacetic with that, either.

Quote:

Conversely the issue with having a smaller rated outlet on a larger rated service is that the outlet itself is not constructed for the increased amperage load. While the load shouldn't exceed whatever machine plugged in is rated for it can (typically at start up). The problem you will have now is that the service from the breaker allows a larger amount of amperage through the outlet than it is rated for and since the breaker doesn't know any better the fault will occur at the outlet and not at the breaker.
The first sentence of this starts out true, but one shouldn't ever use a device with a termination that's not able to support the device's requirements. Next, the outlet never sees a "larger amount of current" through it unless the device asks for it. A circuit doesn't supply more than it's asked for. The rating (breaker and wire,) is for the maximum allowable current draw on that circuit. You can put a 15 amp receptacle on a 50 amp circuit (assuming you could get the wire connected to it, which is a different issue) and can plug any 15amp or lower current device into that outlet. But you can't plug a 50 amp device into that outlet.

If, for example, the OP wants to run his CNC machine on the same 50 amp circuit as his welder, he can either put a matching 50 amp plug on the cable from the CNC (assuming it's a four wire circuit) or put a 30 amp receptacle in parallel to the existing 50 amp receptacle. The latter method should never be used if there's any chance that both the CNC and the welder could be used simultaneously, but this kind of thing is common in one-man/hobby shops.

Honestly, I personally believe that the CNC should have its own dedicated circuit.
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Jim Becker

SR-44 (2018), 1.7kw spindle, Performance Premium, USB, Keypad, T-Slot table (y-axis configuration), WinCNC, VCarve Pro upgraded to Aspire

Non CNC stuff...

SCM/Minimax - slider/JP/BS
Festool "a good collection"
Stubby - lathe
Oneida Cyclone
more...

Retired from full time work in the telecom industry 9/2017
Commission work for equestrian tack storage and other custom furniture and cabinetry
Located Bucks County PA
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